Resources

Racism continues to gain ground and becomes further entrenched in policies, actions, and institutions, with more racially motivated deaths and violence, increased racial terror, limitations on upward mobility, and increasing racial disparities in areas of deficit.

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Free Report explains where we are, where we want to go, and the opportunities that remain for change.

Community Picks

Staff Picks

Yasmina recommends
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Yasmina White

Kim recommends
Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance

Kim Allen

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness has opened my eyes to how corrupt the American judicial system is. It exposes the anomalies that Black and Brown people are railroaded though in the justice system.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

This book really challenged me to rethink financial philanthropy to ensure the focus of the dollars are intended to help communities with their needs rather than creating roadblocks, hoops, and dances for organizations to have to do be funded.

Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance by Edgar Villanueva
Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance by Edgar Villanueva

Aysia recommends
When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Aysia Gilbert

Whitney recommends
The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together

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When They Call You a Terrorist is a book based on the life of Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors. This book speaks on the nuances of being Black in America while addressing the residence and strength of Black people despite their circumstances. Cullors is a champion and spokeswoman for human rights and courageously denounces the abuse and injustice inflicted on Black and Brown folks by US authorities. This is a must read!

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Ashe Bandele
When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Ashe Bandele

Heather McGhee brilliantly weaves together threads of the underlying false narrative that drives inequity and racism in every facet of our society: the zero sum paradigm.  Zero sum says there isn't enough for everyone; in order for someone to win, someone else must lose.  But what McGhee shows us is that while we think we are living under the false pretense zero-sum, in reality we are all losing. This book is a game-changer, highlighting the full cost of racism for everyone.

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone by Heather McGhee
The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone by Heather McGhee

Tracy recommends
The Parker Inheritance

Tracy Tousey Square

ReGina recommends
Eyes That Kiss in the Corners

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A great read for late elementary/early middle-schoolers about two young friends who happen upon a mystery while spending their summer in a small town in South Carolina. As they attempt to solve the mystery, they stumble upon truths about the town and its history. This great book by a Black author featuring two young Black protagonists helps kids (and their adults) understand racism and their role in dismantling it.

The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson
The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

Representation is so important for children, especially in picture books. Eyes That Kiss in the Corner celebrates the facial feature of a girl's Asian family and the stories that go along with those features.  It is a beautiful tale of family, culture, tradition, and the celebration of the differences that make us all beautiful and unique.  I highly recommend this as a read aloud for preschool parents and K-1 teachers; it can also be a read-along for beginning readers.

Eyes That Kiss in the Corners by Joanna Ho
Eyes That Kiss in the Corners by Joanna Ho

To Watch

Community Picks

Staff Picks

Bob recommends
The movie 13th 

Bob Morris Square

ReGina recommends
High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America

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In 13th, DuVernay helps us understand that political compromise left a large, exploitable loophole, in the text of this 1865 amendment - a loophole that, in essence converted slavery from a legal business model to an equally legal method of punishment for criminals.  The film takes us on a thoroughly researched look at the American system of incarceration, specifically helping us understand how today's prison industrial complex disproportionately impacts people of color. It is both informative and shocking, and calls out for change.

As a bit of a foodie, I love learning about the history of cuisine. This four-episode Netflix series examines the history of Africans in this country and how that influenced the cuisine we experience today.  From learning from people in Benin whose families hid in swamps to escape slavery to the story of Thomas Downing, the Black Oyster King of New York, High on the Hog interweaves recipes with personal stories, sparsely known history, and rich traditions in one of the most interesting and engaging documentaries I've seen.

To Listen

Community Picks

Staff Picks

Tom recommends
Nice White Parents

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Kim recommends
Collective Perspective

Kim Allen

Nice White Parents by The New York Times and SERIAL is a five-part series about the intersection of race and public education reform. It was an eye-opener to me for my personal and professional lives.  It is an example of structural racism and unintended perpetuation of bias.

In addition to the fact that they hosted weeks of Race Cards conversations, Collective Perspective podcast show explores difficult social topics with a variety of guests and allows space for people to be human, which is to be multidimensional, complex, and capable of change.

To Support:

LOCAL ORGANIZTIONS ENGAGED IN RACIAL EQUITY AND JUSTICE WORK
  • 2nd Mile Ministries
  • All Things Diverse
  • Civil Rights Learning Exchange
  • Duval Theory of Change
  • Edward Waters University
  • Florida Rising
  • Jacksonville Center for Children's Rights
  • Jacksonville Community Action Committee
  • Jacksonville Human Rights Commission
  • Jacksonville Public Education Fund
  • Jacksonville Urban League
  • Moving the Margins Artist in Residency Program
  • MyVillage Project
  • NAACP Jacksonville Branch
  • Northside Coalition
  • OneJax
  • Take 'Em Down Jax
  • United Way of Northeast Florida
  • Urban Education Symposium
  • Yellow House Art Gallery

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